Ancient DNA reveals how Europeans developed light skin and lactose tolerance

From The Conversation: Ancient DNA reveals how Europeans developed light skin and lactose tolerance.

Food intolerance is often dismissed as a modern invention and a “first-world problem”. However, a study analysing the genomes of 101 Bronze-Age Eurasians reveals that around 90% were lactose intolerant.

The research also sheds light on how modern Europeans came to look the way they do – and that these various traits may originate in different ancient populations. Blue eyes, it suggests, could come from hunter gatherers in Mesolithic Europe (10,000 to 5,000 BC), while other characteristics arrived later with newcomers from the East. [continue]

2 thoughts on “Ancient DNA reveals how Europeans developed light skin and lactose tolerance

  1. I presume this means that Bronze-Age Eurasians would have preferred soy lattes then! On a more serious note, it is fascinating to read about how these different groups each contributed different genetic material to the “whole”. Thanks for posting.

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