Found: Queen of Sheba’s palace?

From The Earth Times: Archaeologists find Queen of Sheba’s palace at Axum, Ethiopia.

Archaeologists believe they have found the Queen of Sheba’s palace at Axum, Ethiopia and an altar which held the most precious treasure of ancient Judaism, the Ark of the Covenant, the University of Hamburg said Wednesday. Scientists from the German city made the startling find during their spring excavation of the site over the past three months.

The Ethiopian queen was the bride of King Solomon of Israel in the 10th century before the Christian era. The royal match is among the memorable events in the Bible.

Ethiopian tradition claims the Ark, which allegedly contained Moses’ stone tablets on which the Ten Commandments were written, was smuggled to Ethiopia by their son Menelek and is still in that country.

The University said scientists led by Helmut Ziegert had found remains of a 10th-century-BC palace at Axum-Dungur under the palace of a later Christian king. There was evidence the early palace [continue]

2 thoughts on “Found: Queen of Sheba’s palace?

  1. “The Ethiopian queen was the bride of King Solomon of Israel in the 10th century before the Christian era. The royal match is among the memorable events in the Bible.”

    Where do people get this stuff? The Bible does not say that the Queen of Sheba was from Ethiopia (many scholars believe she was Arabian), it does not say that she was his “bride,” nor that they were lovers at all. It says she brought him gifts, asked him questions and marveled at his wisdom. That’s all.

  2. 1. I’d like to see the scientists check the altar for residual radiation. To put the speculations to rest.
    2. I didn’t know there was a Sirius Cult and why would it develop with the arrival of Judaism and the Ark of the Covenant? Timing is everything.

    Seriously.

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